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Getting a nose job is a big decision and you want to make sure you’re getting the best procedure possible. A factor in any kind of procedure is costly, and you may be specifically be wondering how much does a good nose job cost? If you’ve been doing your research, you know that the costs of rhinoplasty widely vary. Many factors affect the total cost of a nose job, and high price doesn’t always mean high quality. Typically, the surgeon’s fee for a primary rhinoplasty is between $6,000-10,000. Revisions typically are a bit more costly particularly when they require structural grafting, which is needed if the skeletal framework is weakened or malpositioned.
Rhinoplasty is among the five most popular plastic surgery procedures performed in the United States, with more than 200,000 procedures performed in 2013 alone. [1] During the procedure, a plastic surgeon sculpts the cartilage and bone of the nose to achieve a patient's desired look. For men and women who are unhappy with the size and shape of their nose, rhinoplasty, otherwise known as nose reshaping surgery or a "nose job," offers a safe, effective, and time-tested cosmetic solution. When performed by an experienced, skilled cosmetic surgeon, rhinoplasty can greatly improve the balance of facial features, helping patients discover newfound confidence. Rhinoplasty can also be used to correct structural defects, including those that cause breathing problems.
Dr. S. Valentine Fernandes, the Conjoint Senior Clinical Lecturer, at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Newcastle University, conducted a comprehensive study about the risks of rhinoplasty. According to Fernandes, the complication rate of nose surgery falls between 4 and 18.8 percent. While this may seem an alarming number, Fernandes reports that there is a much lower 1.7 to 5 percent risk of life threatening complications. He also notes that the complication rate falls in proportion to the doctor's surgical experience.
If a patient has suffered an injury to the nose, he or she may benefit from post-traumatic rhinoplasty. This procedure can address both appearance and functionality. Doctors may use this procedure to straighten the nose and correct the nasal septum. Often, post-traumatic patients have suffered a broken nose. In these cases, a doctor may have to re-fracture the nose and re-set it to achieve the desired results. A doctor can usually set a simple broken nose within 10 days of the fracture. However, if a patient has suffered a serious nose injury, he or she may have to wait several months before undergoing extensive surgery.
Both open and closed rhinoplasty can be extremely effective. The doctor will determine the right technique for each patient, based on the natural shape of the nose and the goals for surgery. If the patient desires dramatic changes, or if the doctor is performing post-traumatic rhinoplasty, an open technique may work best. This method gives the doctor access to a larger part of the nose. In many cases, it also helps him or her to make small adjustments to the nasal tip. If a patient wants to address the bridge of the nose, closed rhinoplasty may work well. However, because each patient is different, there are no hard and fast rules regarding the "right" procedure to use.

A technique called “tumescent liposuction" is the most common method for removing fat around the stomach, buttocks, thighs and ankles. It’s also considered the safest. “Tumescent” means that large amounts of buffered salt water are injected into fatty tissue beneath the skin. The doctor makes a cut in the fatty area to be treated, then inserts beneath the flesh a strawlike tube called a cannula that is attached to a vacuum. At the end of the cannula is a stiff wand. The doctor moves it back and forth in rapid motions to loosen fat. The procedure takes 45 minutes to two hours, with a recovery time of up to two weeks. The full effect of liposuction is seen six to 12 weeks after the procedure is performed. After the procedure, the area is bandaged and the patient must wear a compression garment for one to two weeks. Pain and bruising may last up to two weeks, and swelling may last for two weeks to two months.


When doctors operate at these outpatient centers, they should have hospital privileges with at least one local medical center. A doctor must pass rigorous screenings to earn these privileges, so patients can rest assured that their surgeon maintains proper ethical and safety standards. Surgical complications during rhinoplasty are extremely rare. However, hospital privileges ensure that a patient will have access to emergency care in the unlikely event that something does go wrong.


If you are any man (or women) what grab your attention when looking to a lady, The answer would be either Lips, breasts, or buttocks. Having a good proportion of the size and shape is of the Buttock with the rest of the body is an important factor that increases confidence is self-conscious women. If you would like to know more about this procedure, then buckle up!
Getting a nose job is a big decision and you want to make sure you’re getting the best procedure possible. A factor in any kind of procedure is costly, and you may be specifically be wondering how much does a good nose job cost? If you’ve been doing your research, you know that the costs of rhinoplasty widely vary. Many factors affect the total cost of a nose job, and high price doesn’t always mean high quality. Typically, the surgeon’s fee for a primary rhinoplasty is between $6,000-10,000. Revisions typically are a bit more costly particularly when they require structural grafting, which is needed if the skeletal framework is weakened or malpositioned.
Most board certified plastic surgeons will give discounts if more than one area is addressed at the same time. Be careful when comparing pricing between surgeons. Some surgeons will only give you their fee with the surgery center and anesthesiologist billing you separately. Other surgeons will give you a package price which will include their fee, the surgery center and anesthesiologists fee.
The anesthesiologist charges a separate fee for their services. Your doctor may use an anesthesiologist or a certified nurse anesthetist. You can either have IV sedation, which means you are heavily sedated but not asleep during the procedure, or general anesthesia. These two options carry different price tags. A nurse anesthetist typically charges a little less than an anesthesiologist. The difference between the two is that an anesthetist typically only has to complete a nursing program, while an anesthesiologist is a licensed medical doctor who went through medical school.
Secondary rhinoplasty differs from the primary procedure in that it may require cartilage or bone grafting. If too much tissue or bone was removed in the first surgery, the doctor will need to replace this in order to achieve the desired look. Often, cartilage is taken from the ear or other areas of the nose. In rare cases, it is harvested from a rib, in what is known as a costal cartilage graft.
Rhinoplasty can be performed in one of three places: private surgical suites, ambulatory surgical centers, or hospitals. You should speak with your surgeon and make certain that their chosen venue has been accredited by an organization such as the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgical Facilities (AAAA), the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), or the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). 
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