Most people who consider a nose job don’t want to look like someone else, they just want to look like the best version of themselves. A nose job, also known as rhinoplasty, is an outpatient surgery to change the size or shape of your nose. It often addresses the size of your nose in relation to the rest of your face, the width of the bridge, and asymmetry. It can also adjust the appearance of humps or depressions, the shape and position of the tip of your nose, and the size of your nostrils.
Because rhinoplasty is an elective cosmetic procedure, for the majority of people, their insurance will not cover it.  If you have a deviated septum or a serious defect that affects your breathing, you may be able to have insurance cover some of the nose job cost for this septoplasty. An injury, illness or cancer that causes you to lose part of your nose can require a reconstructive rhinoplasty, which may also be partly covered by insurance. This will require preauthorization by the insurance company and other tests or scans to verify the defect.
Patients who are unhappy with their previous nose job results are candidates for secondary rhinoplasty. Whether the nose is deemed too small, too large, or improperly shaped, a skilled surgeon may be able to correct the problem. Patients who experience breathing difficulties following rhinoplasty may also opt to undergo a second procedure. Factors influencing candidacy for revision rhinoplasty include:
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After the patient is sedated, the surgeon creates tiny incisions inside the nostrils or on the columella. Then he or she carefully lifts the skin to access the underlying bone and cartilage. The surgeon can then remove or graft tissues, as needed. Typically, a doctor uses conservative methods to minimize the impact to the surrounding tissues while still achieving the desired results. When the reshaping process is complete, the doctor lays the skin back down over the new contours of the nose and closes the incisions.
Karen Hellesvig-Gaskell is a broadcast journalist who began writing professionally in 1980. Her writing focuses on parenting and health, and has appeared in “Spirituality & Health Magazine" and “Essential Wellness.” Hellesvig-Gaskell has worked with autistic children at the Fraser School in Minneapolis and as a child care assistant for toddlers and preschoolers at the International School of Minnesota, Eden Prairie.
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