“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”

During your search for a surgeon, keep in mind that “as with any cosmetic procedure, the price should not be the primary factor in choosing your surgeon,” Orlando, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Armando Soto, says in a RealSelf Q&A. “This is not to say that less expensive surgeons are uniformly going to deliver poor care, just that the costs should be secondary to your overall sense of comfort and confidence in the surgeon you choose.”
Rhinoplasty is a highly personal procedure that can affect a person's mental well-being, as well as his or her appearance. Therefore, it is vital that patients choose a surgeon with whom they feel comfortable. They should select a doctor who truly listens to their concerns, answers their questions, and creates a treatment plan that will address their specific goals. Patients should never choose someone who makes unrealistic promises or pressures them to undergo more surgery than they actually want.

On the day of your surgery, you should not eat anything before the procedure. Because chewing involves moving the entire face, doctors typically recommend a soft or liquid diet for the first several days. You will be able to return to solid food whenever it is comfortable for you. Additionally, you should avoid spicy foods, as they can constrict the blood vessels and lead to increased bruising.


Right now, surgeons follow guidelines that set a maximum extraction limit of 5,000 milliliters of fat (11 pounds) for all patients, regardless of variations in weight or body fat status. But the new study suggests surgeons could use a patient's body mass index (BMI) to determine how much fat extraction is safe. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight measurements.
If you’d like to find our more about the pros and cons to rhinoplasty and a non-surgical nose job, please email or call our office to set up an appointment. The full advantages and disadvantages can be discussed in a consultation with the doctor, as well, you can discover if you are a good candidate for one or both procedures. We would love to hear from you!
Aging brings on a general redistribution of body fat, especially around the middle. For women, childbirth can leave behind a roll of stubborn and unsightly belly fat. And, of course, genetics count for a lot, too. But when it comes to liposuction, not all fat is created equal. Fat that’s resistant to diet and exercise is usually subcutaneous fat, which lies beneath the skin and on top of the abdominal muscle wall. The good news is that’s what liposuction is intended to remove. Liposuction can remove pockets of flab, recontour your middle and improve your shape.

Although liposuction is used to get rid of fat, it’s not a weight-loss solution. Liposuction works best on deposits of fat that are concentrated in particular areas and resistant to exercise, particularly around the stomach, thighs, hips and buttocks. You might lose a little weight, but it’s not likely to be significant. Liposuction also won’t fix a bulging stomach that’s caused by weakness in the abdominal wall, and it won't tighten loose skin. For toning and flattening the abdominal area, however, liposuction is sometimes combined with abdominoplasty, also known as a tummy tuck, in which fat is removed from the belly, the muscle wall repaired and excess skin removed.

If you are any man (or women) what grab your attention when looking to a lady, The answer would be either Lips, breasts, or buttocks. Having a good proportion of the size and shape is of the Buttock with the rest of the body is an important factor that increases confidence is self-conscious women. If you would like to know more about this procedure, then buckle up!


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