Case 47: This patient’s primary surgery left her with valve collapse, nostril notching, persistent tip rounding and hanging columella. Secondary surgery involved correction of these issues with repositioning and reconstruction of the tip cartilages to improve tip contour. Although she is still a little swollen in the after photos, she is already happy with her new nose.
Each year, thousands of women undergo breast lift procedures to restore the shape and volume of their breasts for a more youthful breast contour. Oftentimes breast lifts are combined with other procedures such as breast augmentation or breast reduction. In cases like these, the breasts are lifted as they are increased or decreased in size. The result are breasts that look and feel better!
As we age, our bodies undergo numerous changes. Gravity takes hold, and the skin’s elasticity weakens. This can result in drooping, sagging breasts. Over time, a woman’s breasts may lose their perkiness, and can also lose volume. Pregnancy and breastfeeding can exacerbate these effects. The changes in breast appearance can have a tremendous effect on a woman’s self-esteem.
Case 40: Excessive nasal width can cause the nose to dominate other fine, delicate facial features. In Ethnic Rhinoplasty, the key to obtaining a more refined nose is to create a nasal framework upon which the thick skin will wrap around. This pretty young Persian woman wanted to reduce her nasal width, the fullness in her tip, and the sense that her tip was downturned. These six month photos show significant improvements in achieving these goals and her nose will only get better yet.
In addition to a breast lift, many women also consider having other procedures performed at the same time to enhance the overall result. For example, a “mommy makeover” is a combination of different surgical procedures reserved for women who have been pregnant and want to look like they did before the pregnancy. This may include a tummy tuck, liposuction surgery and breast enlargement or breast reduction. There is also a cost savings of having multiple procedures done at the same time.
Case 25: This patient had what is called a tension nose wherein a convexity on the bridge pushes the tip forward and down. Notice how this also puts tension on the upper lip and appears to tether it from inside. a combination of straightening, improving breathing, removing the hump, and setting the tip appropriately also helps to relax the upper lip and complete the look.
The surgeon’s fee is the most difficult to predict without first knowing the extent of the procedure and the qualifications of the plastic surgeon. The geographical location of the practice also plays a role in your cost. Surgeons who practice in highly populated urban areas tend to charge more because their overhead is higher and they are in greater demand than their counterparts in rural or suburban areas.
Once your bone and cartilage have been resculpted, your surgeon pulls the skin back down and stitches it along the open-rhinoplasty incision across the columella (the tissue that links the nasal tip to the nasal base). “When done properly, that incision is extremely hard to see, once it’s healed,” says Dr. Miller. With a closed procedure, the incisions are made inside your nostrils, so there’s no visible scarring, and the sutures are usually dissolvable. 

On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”

The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
Case 38: This beautiful young lady is an early 6 month example of a finesse rhinoplasty. On front view you can see the bridge is narrower and the sense of hang is improved. On profile, the tip looks undone, natural and less projected with correction of the slight hanging columella. The result is a beautiful, natural look that corrects the issues but leaves her looking totally natural and undone.
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