However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
Dr. Fouda Neel is one of the leading surgeons in the field of cosmetic surgery. Prior to your procedure he will explain what is involved in your aftercare. It is important that you pick up any prescriptions for pain medication or antibiotics before your surgery. Not all patients require post-surgery antibiotics and Dr. Fouda Neel will discuss this with you during your initial meeting.

Case 33: For this young woman, the nose felt boxy and unrefined in comparison to her more defined facial features. Goals of rhinoplasty included lifting and definition of the tip along with subtle hump reduction to create a more sleek and streamlined nasal contour. Achievement of these goals creates a nose that harmonizes rather than dominating other features.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
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