Asian, Latin, and African American rhinoplasties require a special skill set. Surgeons say the challenge lies in reshaping and resizing the nose while retaining its distinct features and keeping it proportional to the face. “Typically, African American, Asian, and Latin noses have flat bridges and wide tips,” says Dr. Miller. “The number-one goal is to create a new tip [through cartilage grafting] that has better support.” Patients also often request a reduction in nostril size. 
Case 42: Crooked noses can be one of the hardest things to correct in Rhinoplasty, especially if there has been significant trauma involved. The entire nose must be reconstructed in order to make the desired improvements. It took a lot of work to straighten and improve breathing in this patient’s nose. At the same time, his Beverly Hills Rhinoplasty was designed to make his nose a little smaller, more refined, and less down-turned while still looking natural. Even the scar on his tip was improved as part of his surgery.
Case 96: To see how well our results last, see these photos of our patient 8 years after rhinoplasty and facial fat transfer! Her rhinoplasty involved softening her look and removing the convexity on the bridge that made her tip look downturned. Fat transfer under the eyes has stood the test of time and really helped to reduce her under eye hollows to noticeably brighten her appearance.
The procedure also does not permanently change the breast shape and firmness. As time marches on, you may expect the effects of aging and gravity to continue. In these cases, a secondary revision surgery may be required. The best candidates for this cosmetic surgery are women who are emotionally well-adjusted, have realistic expectations, and understand the procedure thoroughly.
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