On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”


As with most plastic surgery, getting more than one procedure done at one time can save you money in anesthesia and facility fees. Prices will vary by surgeon, but it is always best to look for the most qualified doctor rather than the lowest price. Also, some doctors will offer discounts to patients who agree to give testimonials or allow the doctor to use their before and after photos.
You’ll be in a recovery room immediately after surgery. When getting ready to leave, a nurse will go over instructions on how to care for the drainage tubes, antibiotic use, and other important information about post-surgical care. She will also discuss symptoms that are commonly felt after surgery as well as the types of complications that could result.
A revision rhinoplasty is a complicated surgery, because the surgeon now has to contend with thick scar tissue—which makes it difficult to raise the skin and soft tissue off the cartilage. “Plus, we often need to reconstruct part of the nose, so we need to take cartilage from other sources,” says Dr. Miller. Surgeons say that the minimum amount of time to wait before you can do revision rhinoplasty, even if there is an obvious problem, is a full year. 
Asian, Latin, and African American rhinoplasties require a special skill set. Surgeons say the challenge lies in reshaping and resizing the nose while retaining its distinct features and keeping it proportional to the face. “Typically, African American, Asian, and Latin noses have flat bridges and wide tips,” says Dr. Miller. “The number-one goal is to create a new tip [through cartilage grafting] that has better support.” Patients also often request a reduction in nostril size. 
We think you shouldn’t have to wait to look better, and more importantly, feel better about yourself. To help our patients afford breast lifts, we offer several financing options. When you apply, we’ll take a look at your credit history to determine your qualification and financing amount. Upon approval, you can book a date for your procedure. Afterward, you’ll make monthly payments. Financing can help you get where you want to be sooner rather than later.

Case 47: This patient’s primary surgery left her with valve collapse, nostril notching, persistent tip rounding and hanging columella. Secondary surgery involved correction of these issues with repositioning and reconstruction of the tip cartilages to improve tip contour. Although she is still a little swollen in the after photos, she is already happy with her new nose.

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