Case 89: This patient had broken her nose with consequent severe loss of tip support, tip rounding, crookedness, and a traumatic bump. In this case, a lateral crural overlay technique was used to reduce and lift the tip along with a septal extension to help with support and straightening which has improved tremendously as seen on the base view. Even though she’s still swollen in these early photos, she already has a great result and it’s only going to get better.
Disclaimer: Please note, any information on this page is provided to you for educational and/or informational purposes only, and should not be construed as an endorsement of any particular procedure, product or treatment. This information is also not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. For medical concerns, including decisions about any procedure, product or treatment, visitors should always consult with their doctor or other qualified health care professional.
A rhinoplasty, commonly called a nose job, is a surgical procedure that changes the shape and, often, the size of your nose. If your nose has a prominent bump, crooked bridge, or wide tip, or it seems too big (or even too small) in relation to the rest of your facial features, surgical rhinoplasty could be your best option to correct it. It’s sometimes combined (and often confused) with a septoplasty—the surgical correction of a deviated septum, a condition where the wall between your nasal passages is crooked. A septoplasty is performed to improve breathing, while a rhinoplasty is usually performed for cosmetic enhancement.  Both procedures can be performed simultaneously under one anesthetic, with one recovery period.
Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.

Case 69: This patient was bothered by his prominent ears and a sense of width to his nose that made it feel bulky and unrefined in his view. While still preserving his ethnic identity, he was able to achieve a meaningful improvement in nasal balance. Bringing his ears back into the vertical plane helped to make them less noticeable and remove them as a source of focus for him.
Case 47: This patient’s primary surgery left her with valve collapse, nostril notching, persistent tip rounding and hanging columella. Secondary surgery involved correction of these issues with repositioning and reconstruction of the tip cartilages to improve tip contour. Although she is still a little swollen in the after photos, she is already happy with her new nose.
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.

Tip: Look for a board-certified plastic surgeon with plenty of experience performing breast surgery. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons[2] provides a free referral service. When you meet with a surgeon, discuss your expectations to find out whether they are realistic. Also discuss risks and disadvantages. One major disadvantage of the breast lift procedure is that it inevitably leaves scars, which can be red, bumpy and very noticeable. Also, the surgery can cause numbness, tingling and loss of sensation in the breasts and nipples, which usually, but not always, disappear over time.
Case 3: A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger.

The traditional breast lift reshapes the breast by removing tissue. This improves only the lower part, at and below the nipple. It does nothing for the area above your nipple. While this does eliminate sagging, it does not improve the roundness of your breasts. With time, a breast that's been lifted using traditional techniques will start to take on an odd flattened out, tubular appearance, because all the tissue is in the bottom part. To prevent this, many women get implants. But why bother with implants if you don't need them?
A: It’s difficult to answer “how much” sensitivity you can expect to lose after breast lift surgery but most patients report that they are able to retain complete or near complete sensation. During the initial postoperative period, there may be a temporary loss or decrease in sensation primarily due to swelling. As the swelling subsides, the sensation will return. There is the potential that you may experience a change in the sensitivity of your nipples and the skin of your breast. On occasion, patients have reported that their nipples are “supersensitive.” In this case desensitization, exercises can be performed to diminish the sensitivity. This involves gently rubbing the nipples with cotton ball and then progressing to a more course material.
The procedure also does not permanently change the breast shape and firmness. As time marches on, you may expect the effects of aging and gravity to continue. In these cases, a secondary revision surgery may be required. The best candidates for this cosmetic surgery are women who are emotionally well-adjusted, have realistic expectations, and understand the procedure thoroughly.
×