If you’re having what’s called an open rhinoplasty, the surgeon will make an incision (about 6 millimeters long) in the skin between the nostrils. “Open rhinoplasty is a very common technique, where the skin is lifted upward like the hood on a car,” says Dr. Ronald Schuster, a Baltimore plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A about open vs. closed rhinoplasties. If you’re having a closed rhinoplasty, all incisions are placed on the inside of the nose, so there are no external scars.


On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”
The procedure also does not permanently change the breast shape and firmness. As time marches on, you may expect the effects of aging and gravity to continue. In these cases, a secondary revision surgery may be required. The best candidates for this cosmetic surgery are women who are emotionally well-adjusted, have realistic expectations, and understand the procedure thoroughly. 
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