The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.

As with most plastic surgery, getting more than one procedure done at one time can save you money in anesthesia and facility fees. Prices will vary by surgeon, but it is always best to look for the most qualified doctor rather than the lowest price. Also, some doctors will offer discounts to patients who agree to give testimonials or allow the doctor to use their before and after photos.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
×