On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”
Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
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