Case 4: Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.
Case 94: This patient was seeing the early signs of facial aging including loss of skin tone and elasticity, early jowling, and heaviness under the chin. A lower facelift along with fat transfer to the under eye and cheek area substantially improved the contour and even apparent texture of her skin, making her look noticeably younger. In addition, the overall effect was completed with a rhinoplasty focused on reducing the width, rounding, and thickness of her tip and nostrils which is a challenge in the setting of thick skin.
Case 38: This beautiful young lady is an early 6 month example of a finesse rhinoplasty. On front view you can see the bridge is narrower and the sense of hang is improved. On profile, the tip looks undone, natural and less projected with correction of the slight hanging columella. The result is a beautiful, natural look that corrects the issues but leaves her looking totally natural and undone.

Case 16: A crooked and overprojected nose draws the eye away from other beautiful features. In this pretty young woman, you can see how rhinoplasty transforms her face. Even at this early 3-month point, we see that her nose is more feminine and no longer dominates her otherwise delicate features. And, at the same time, it is balanced and ethnically-appropriate.


Case 47: This patient’s primary surgery left her with valve collapse, nostril notching, persistent tip rounding and hanging columella. Secondary surgery involved correction of these issues with repositioning and reconstruction of the tip cartilages to improve tip contour. Although she is still a little swollen in the after photos, she is already happy with her new nose.

On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”

Case 88: The goals of this septorhinoplasty were to straighten her crooked nose and improve breathing. She also hated how her nasal hump and length brought attention to her irregular profile. In our opinion, the mark of a good rhinoplasty is that the nose should become a background feature, and she’s very happy to have achieved that goal with her Profiles rhinoplasty.

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