A: In general, no plastic surgeon can guarantee that breastfeeding will still be possible after the breast lift surgery. But in most cases, you should be able to breastfeed after a breast lift if the nipple was left intact during the procedure, and was still connected to all the anatomical structures underneath the nipple. However, if you are planning to become pregnant, its recommended that you wait until after your pregnancy to have a breast lift. Reason being, as your breasts enlarge during pregnancy the skin will stretch. Depending on the elasticity of your skin before pregnancy and the degree to which your breasts enlarge during pregnancy, your breast skin may permanently stretch. In this case the results of breast lift surgery performed before pregnancy would be lost.
This procedure is for women who need additional volume as well as a lift. Depending on the placement of the implant, a breast lift can occur as a result for women with a low degree of droop, without the need to make any incisions. For women who have a moderate to severe breast droop, breast lift incisions along with breast implant insertion will be needed to achieve optimal results.
Your breasts will be bruised and swollen for the first few weeks, and they’ll probably feel heavy and tight. According to Dr. Ted Eisenberg, a Philadelphia plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A, “women report minimal discomfort after breast lift surgery.” But you should have pain medication prescribed for the first few days, just in case you need it. After that, Tylenol should do the trick.
Arm LiftBody ContouringBody LiftBotulinum ToxinBreast AugmentationBreast Implant Removal & ExchangeBreast LiftBreast ReconstructionBreast ReductionBrow LiftButtock Lift with AugmentationChin AugmentationCleft Lip and PalateDermal FillersEar SurgeryEyelid SurgeryFaceliftGynecomastia SurgeryHair TransplantLip AugmentationLiposuctionRhinoplastyThigh LiftTummy Tuck
Case 72: This patient had sustained a nasal fracture that caused a significant deviation of her nose. The fracture was corrected along with a septoplasty to improve breathing. Loss of tip support after the injury made her hump look more prominent and her tip felt more droopy. The bump was smoothened and her tip angulation restored to create the softer, more feminine profile she wanted. At the same time, fat transfer to the cheek and under eye area and subtle neck liposuction substantially improved the flat cheek and mid-face contour that previously made her feel hollowed and tired looking without makeup.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
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