Case 22: This young woman was happy with her profile but wanted to reduce nasal width, tip boxiness, and nostril flare on front and three-quarter views. The combination of narrowing her bridge, tip refinement, and nostril reduction helped bring her nose into balance. At the same time, fat transfer to the under eye hollows did a fantastic job of brightening her eyes and giving her a more youthful look.

If you plan to have children in the future you may want to postpone cosmetic breast surgery until after pregnancy and after you are done breast feeding. Pregnancy may stretch the breasts and may reduce the volume of the breasts. Both of these factors may counter the benefits of breast lift surgery. In fact, breast skin ages over time, which may impact breast sagging and the appearance of a breast lift.


On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”

Chances are good that you know at least one person who’s had a nose job. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons says that rhinoplasty is the third most popular cosmetic surgery, with more than 200,000 patients opting for the nose procedure every year. Whether it’s right for you depends on a number of factors, including the cosmetic and structural issues you’re looking to change, your budget, and the amount of time you can take off for recovery.


The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
Case 60: Facial aging can be hard on someone who is naturally thin by creating a more severe and skeletonized appearance as facial fat is lost. A combined approach was used to create a beautiful transformation, including a trichophytic brow lift, lower lid tightening, and facelift along with a conservative rhinoplasty to straighten and balance her nose. Notice how the eyes are opened up and facial hollows are smoothened without the surprised look that can accompany over-aggressive lifts. You’ll also see that incisions are hidden within the hairline and natural skin creases making them almost invisible.
The vertical breast lift, which involves an anchor shaped scar on the breast, is what every plastic surgeon learns to do while training in cosmetic surgery. It's been around for at least 60 years, and hasn't been updated since it was first introduced! No wonder Dr. Kara was never totally comfortable with the technique. Results would not last as long as he thought they should for such extensive scarring. On top of that, there would be no fullness in the upper part of the breast, so as the lifted breasts sagged with time, they would start looking tubular and flat on the bottom. That's why Dr. Kara prefers the BEST for his patients by performing the Bellesoma™ Method!

A: In general, no plastic surgeon can guarantee that breastfeeding will still be possible after the breast lift surgery. But in most cases, you should be able to breastfeed after a breast lift if the nipple was left intact during the procedure, and was still connected to all the anatomical structures underneath the nipple. However, if you are planning to become pregnant, its recommended that you wait until after your pregnancy to have a breast lift. Reason being, as your breasts enlarge during pregnancy the skin will stretch. Depending on the elasticity of your skin before pregnancy and the degree to which your breasts enlarge during pregnancy, your breast skin may permanently stretch. In this case the results of breast lift surgery performed before pregnancy would be lost.
Aging can affect our entire bodies. For women, their breasts can lose their shape and volume creating a saggy and disproportionate chest appearance. Gravity, pregnancy, breastfeeding and weight fluctuations can also add to the breasts’ loss of definition. A breast lift, otherwise known as a mastopexy, can correct the aforementioned issues and restore the breasts allowing them to appear perky and more youthful.
A Bra Lift with Laser (Laser Bra Lift): Some doctors will want to use a laser bra lift as an insurance policy that your breasts won’t sag. It’s actually not really an alternative to breast lift surgery as it is an extra procedure. In the laser bra surgery, the laser is used to create a bra-like effect that protects the surgical results of the breast lift. Laser energy will always stimulate the production of new collagen fibers, which give you more support of any tissues. Always look at the before and after pictures to see whether or not you think there is enough improvement.
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