Asian, Latin, and African American rhinoplasties require a special skill set. Surgeons say the challenge lies in reshaping and resizing the nose while retaining its distinct features and keeping it proportional to the face. “Typically, African American, Asian, and Latin noses have flat bridges and wide tips,” says Dr. Miller. “The number-one goal is to create a new tip [through cartilage grafting] that has better support.” Patients also often request a reduction in nostril size. 
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
Case 16: A crooked and overprojected nose draws the eye away from other beautiful features. In this pretty young woman, you can see how rhinoplasty transforms her face. Even at this early 3-month point, we see that her nose is more feminine and no longer dominates her otherwise delicate features. And, at the same time, it is balanced and ethnically-appropriate.
The Duke and Duchess reside at Nottingham Cottage at London, at the basis of Kensington Palace. They’re expectant their primary kid in 2019. The youngster will be in line to the throne. Next, to the arrival, they’ll proceed to Frogmore Cottage at Home Park, at the basis of Windsor Castle. However, their workplace will carry on to function in Kensington Palace.
Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.
Case 3: A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger. 

Case 21: For our patients who are in image-centered occupations such as modeling or acting, nasal refinements often focus on small changes that will enhance the overall look and remove subtle cues about the nose that preoccupy or distract the eye. This successful model had a look that really worked for her but had always felt that her tip and nostrils were too wide, flared, and slightly droopy. Creation of a slightly narrower and more structured tip draws unwanted attention away from her nose and, instead, enhances her overall look.
Case 88: The goals of this septorhinoplasty were to straighten her crooked nose and improve breathing. She also hated how her nasal hump and length brought attention to her irregular profile. In our opinion, the mark of a good rhinoplasty is that the nose should become a background feature, and she’s very happy to have achieved that goal with her Profiles rhinoplasty.
This procedure is for women who need additional volume as well as a lift. Depending on the placement of the implant, a breast lift can occur as a result for women with a low degree of droop, without the need to make any incisions. For women who have a moderate to severe breast droop, breast lift incisions along with breast implant insertion will be needed to achieve optimal results. 

We think you shouldn’t have to wait to look better, and more importantly, feel better about yourself. To help our patients afford breast lifts, we offer several financing options. When you apply, we’ll take a look at your credit history to determine your qualification and financing amount. Upon approval, you can book a date for your procedure. Afterward, you’ll make monthly payments. Financing can help you get where you want to be sooner rather than later.


Case 42: Crooked noses can be one of the hardest things to correct in Rhinoplasty, especially if there has been significant trauma involved. The entire nose must be reconstructed in order to make the desired improvements. It took a lot of work to straighten and improve breathing in this patient’s nose. At the same time, his Beverly Hills Rhinoplasty was designed to make his nose a little smaller, more refined, and less down-turned while still looking natural. Even the scar on his tip was improved as part of his surgery.

The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
Dr. Fouda Neel is one of the leading surgeons in the field of cosmetic surgery. Prior to your procedure he will explain what is involved in your aftercare. It is important that you pick up any prescriptions for pain medication or antibiotics before your surgery. Not all patients require post-surgery antibiotics and Dr. Fouda Neel will discuss this with you during your initial meeting.
How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.
Case 43: Rhinoplasty in this pretty professional woman was all about removing the bump she had hated for years and correcting the tip droop and asymmetry that had worsened with age. Relatively small changes here have created a real sense of refinement while maintaining her long, elegant profile. A lower face and neck lift along with facial fat transfer helped to round out the enhancements in her already beautiful appearance.
Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.
Case 61: The concerns in this case were crookedness and a significant breathing issue due to a severely deviated septum. She also felt her nose was over-projected and a little too big for her face. Here we can see resolution of her crooked septum on base view. The tip has been defined and de-projected and the bump brought down to create a naturally pretty and more balanced contour.
Case 43: Rhinoplasty in this pretty professional woman was all about removing the bump she had hated for years and correcting the tip droop and asymmetry that had worsened with age. Relatively small changes here have created a real sense of refinement while maintaining her long, elegant profile. A lower face and neck lift along with facial fat transfer helped to round out the enhancements in her already beautiful appearance.
Case 75: Getting a severely crooked nose as close to perfectly straight as possible is one of the hardest things to accomplish in rhinoplasty. Our extensive experience at Profiles with traumatic noses has us well positioned to treat these difficult cases and achieve a nasal contour that is no longer a focal point but now blends with the rest of her features.

Case 3: A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger.
A rhinoplasty, commonly called a nose job, is a surgical procedure that changes the shape and, often, the size of your nose. If your nose has a prominent bump, crooked bridge, or wide tip, or it seems too big (or even too small) in relation to the rest of your facial features, surgical rhinoplasty could be your best option to correct it. It’s sometimes combined (and often confused) with a septoplasty—the surgical correction of a deviated septum, a condition where the wall between your nasal passages is crooked. A septoplasty is performed to improve breathing, while a rhinoplasty is usually performed for cosmetic enhancement.  Both procedures can be performed simultaneously under one anesthetic, with one recovery period.
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