Case 75: Getting a severely crooked nose as close to perfectly straight as possible is one of the hardest things to accomplish in rhinoplasty. Our extensive experience at Profiles with traumatic noses has us well positioned to treat these difficult cases and achieve a nasal contour that is no longer a focal point but now blends with the rest of her features.
Dr. Miller says it’s also important for patients to have realistic expectations. “It’s not a good idea to take a wide, thick nose and turn it into one that’s thin and tiny,” he says. “But if the steps are done properly, we can make the desired changes.” Thick nasal skin that makes it challenging to refine the nasal tip needs to be thinned out, for example. It’s important to find a board-certified facial plastic surgeon who specializes in ethnic rhinoplasties. 
Case 72: This patient had sustained a nasal fracture that caused a significant deviation of her nose. The fracture was corrected along with a septoplasty to improve breathing. Loss of tip support after the injury made her hump look more prominent and her tip felt more droopy. The bump was smoothened and her tip angulation restored to create the softer, more feminine profile she wanted. At the same time, fat transfer to the cheek and under eye area and subtle neck liposuction substantially improved the flat cheek and mid-face contour that previously made her feel hollowed and tired looking without makeup.

Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.


Case 31: This patient had some typical concerns of feeling washed out from the front with flattening and spreading of her tip. She was very happy with the narrowing and definition achieved for her bridge and tip along with nostril reduction. In addition, chin augmentation increased chin projection to improve the balance of her lower face and jawline.
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
The procedure also does not permanently change the breast shape and firmness. As time marches on, you may expect the effects of aging and gravity to continue. In these cases, a secondary revision surgery may be required. The best candidates for this cosmetic surgery are women who are emotionally well-adjusted, have realistic expectations, and understand the procedure thoroughly.
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