On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”

Case 16: A crooked and overprojected nose draws the eye away from other beautiful features. In this pretty young woman, you can see how rhinoplasty transforms her face. Even at this early 3-month point, we see that her nose is more feminine and no longer dominates her otherwise delicate features. And, at the same time, it is balanced and ethnically-appropriate.
Case 38: This beautiful young lady is an early 6 month example of a finesse rhinoplasty. On front view you can see the bridge is narrower and the sense of hang is improved. On profile, the tip looks undone, natural and less projected with correction of the slight hanging columella. The result is a beautiful, natural look that corrects the issues but leaves her looking totally natural and undone.
×