Rhinoplasty is one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries among teenagers. It is important for teenage patients and their surgeons to consider whether or not nose reshaping is an appropriate cosmetic surgery option. Doctors should ensure that the decision to undergo rhinoplasty is the patient's own choice, rather than the result of peer or parental pressure. Regardless of the reason for surgery, doctors recommend that girls wait until age 14 or 15, and that boys wait a few additional years to undergo rhinoplasty. By this time, the nose should have finished growing.


Choosing a liposuction surgeon based on the lowest price might ultimately be the most expensive choice, If the initial cosmetic results are so bad that another surgeon must be paid to repair the work of the first liposuction surgeon. Among the most common undesirable outcomes of liposuction are 1) incomplete liposuction with very little evidence that liposuction was actually done, 2) excessive liposuction producing an unnatural or disfigured appearance, 3) irregular and uneven results with unsightly depressions in the skin, and 4) large scars that reveal that the patient has had liposuction. Caveat emptor (Buyer beware).

Before anything else, the surgeon determines a patient's candidacy for rhinoplasty. He or she takes the patient's health history, asks about medications and whether the patient smokes, and addresses other concerns. It is important for the patient to be honest with the doctor. Withholding certain information could increase the risk of surgical complications.
Chin augmentation and chin reduction are the two most common treatments to combine with rhinoplasty. To perform chin augmentation, a surgeon places a silicone implant through an incision inside the mouth or just under the chin. In chin reduction, the incisions are placed in the same locations. Then the surgeon reshapes the chin bone, carefully removing millimeters of material to create a more aesthetically pleasing shape.
Patients may require reconstructive rhinoplasty if they have lost all or part of their noses to an accident, skin cancer, or another serious illness. During the treatment, a surgeon rebuilds the nose using skin grafts, flap techniques, and other advanced methods. Due to the complex nature of this procedure, patients may require multiple surgeries over a period of several months. Additionally, reconstructive rhinoplasty is a specialized procedure, and patients should look for surgeons who have extensive experience in this area.

If a patient has suffered an injury to the nose, he or she may benefit from post-traumatic rhinoplasty. This procedure can address both appearance and functionality. Doctors may use this procedure to straighten the nose and correct the nasal septum. Often, post-traumatic patients have suffered a broken nose. In these cases, a doctor may have to re-fracture the nose and re-set it to achieve the desired results. A doctor can usually set a simple broken nose within 10 days of the fracture. However, if a patient has suffered a serious nose injury, he or she may have to wait several months before undergoing extensive surgery.

After the patient is sedated, the surgeon creates tiny incisions inside the nostrils or on the columella. Then he or she carefully lifts the skin to access the underlying bone and cartilage. The surgeon can then remove or graft tissues, as needed. Typically, a doctor uses conservative methods to minimize the impact to the surrounding tissues while still achieving the desired results. When the reshaping process is complete, the doctor lays the skin back down over the new contours of the nose and closes the incisions.

Secondary rhinoplasty differs from the primary procedure in that it may require cartilage or bone grafting. If too much tissue or bone was removed in the first surgery, the doctor will need to replace this in order to achieve the desired look. Often, cartilage is taken from the ear or other areas of the nose. In rare cases, it is harvested from a rib, in what is known as a costal cartilage graft.
Dr. Weinberg does not endorse or lend his name to any specific product, medication, or device. The information on this page is meant to familiarize prospective patients with some of the commonly available treatments/products and devices in use for specific issues and is intended for general educational purposes only. Decisions regarding treatments in a specific patient must be made in the context of a medical consultation.
When doctors operate at these outpatient centers, they should have hospital privileges with at least one local medical center. A doctor must pass rigorous screenings to earn these privileges, so patients can rest assured that their surgeon maintains proper ethical and safety standards. Surgical complications during rhinoplasty are extremely rare. However, hospital privileges ensure that a patient will have access to emergency care in the unlikely event that something does go wrong.
Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Brent Moelleken notes in a RealSelf Q&A that “By nature, surgery causes soreness, and patients are usually restricted from full workouts for a period of time after surgery. This explains the weight gains often noticed immediately afterward.” But it’s important to get back into the habit as soon as you’re able. “Some patients gain a false sense of confidence after their liposuction procedure,” he says. “If anything, patients should plan on being more active and healthier about their eating habits after surgery than they were before.”
One of the main things to keep in mind regarding medical tourism is how difficult it may be to see or even contact your doctor after surgery. Follow-up appointments are extremely important. When surgery is performed internationally, patients either miss post-operative appointments or have to stay in the area for an extended period of time. When you have surgery closer to home, you can more easily attend these appointments and visit your surgeon if any other problems or concerns arise. Many surgeons like myself will revise their own work at no additional charge except for anesthesia fees or surgical venue fees.
Aging brings on a general redistribution of body fat, especially around the middle. For women, childbirth can leave behind a roll of stubborn and unsightly belly fat. And, of course, genetics count for a lot, too. But when it comes to liposuction, not all fat is created equal. Fat that’s resistant to diet and exercise is usually subcutaneous fat, which lies beneath the skin and on top of the abdominal muscle wall. The good news is that’s what liposuction is intended to remove. Liposuction can remove pockets of flab, recontour your middle and improve your shape.
Ambulatory surgical centers are more expensive than private offices. These venues are owned by a third party, and provide everything your surgeon needs to safely perform rhinoplasty and other cosmetic surgery procedures. They typically charge by the hour. Ambulatory surgical center fees are usually around $3,000 or more for a single rhinoplasty procedure.
Rhinoplasty surgery, also known as nose reshaping surgery, can be used to correct a number of aesthetic flaws. The surgery can result in a greater balance of facial features, the elimination of bumps or unevenness, and a noticeable change in the size of the nose. In order to achieve ideal results, however, it is important for patients to be completely candid with their surgeon prior to surgery.

Rhinoplasty is among the five most popular plastic surgery procedures performed in the United States, with more than 200,000 procedures performed in 2013 alone. [1] During the procedure, a plastic surgeon sculpts the cartilage and bone of the nose to achieve a patient's desired look. For men and women who are unhappy with the size and shape of their nose, rhinoplasty, otherwise known as nose reshaping surgery or a "nose job," offers a safe, effective, and time-tested cosmetic solution. When performed by an experienced, skilled cosmetic surgeon, rhinoplasty can greatly improve the balance of facial features, helping patients discover newfound confidence. Rhinoplasty can also be used to correct structural defects, including those that cause breathing problems.
Although cost is certainly an important factor when it comes to deciding where to have a nose job, making sure you find the right surgeon should be at the top of your list of needs. After you do your online research or talk to friends who have had the same or a similar procedure, schedule a consultation with your top choices. At the consultation, come prepared with questions to address all of your concerns and ensure that your needs will be met.  Some questions to ask include:
In the initial surgical consultation, patients should discuss their specific needs and aesthetic goals to ensure that these goals are realistic. While rhinoplasty can achieve dramatic results, the procedure will not completely alter a patient's appearance. Rather, it is intended to enhance an individual's beauty and correct minor to moderate imperfections. Fortunately, even small changes can have major, positive effects on a patient's overall appearance.
“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”

Before anything else, the surgeon determines a patient's candidacy for rhinoplasty. He or she takes the patient's health history, asks about medications and whether the patient smokes, and addresses other concerns. It is important for the patient to be honest with the doctor. Withholding certain information could increase the risk of surgical complications.

Secondary rhinoplasty differs from the primary procedure in that it may require cartilage or bone grafting. If too much tissue or bone was removed in the first surgery, the doctor will need to replace this in order to achieve the desired look. Often, cartilage is taken from the ear or other areas of the nose. In rare cases, it is harvested from a rib, in what is known as a costal cartilage graft.

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