Dr. Torgerson is a Facial Plastic Surgeon in Toronto, having achieved the highest degree of credentials and training in Canada. His specialty, focus, and dedication is to Facial Plastic Surgery and Ear, Nose and Throat (Otolaryngology). Therefore, his work is targeted, advanced, and refined. Over the years, Dr. Torgerson’s experience, aesthetic eye for beauty and expert injector ability has caused him to be in high demand with patients and health professionals alike. Dr. Torgerson travels regularly, providing training, demonstrations, and teaching the latest innovative techniques to other surgeons, physicians, and nurse injectors. Patients who visit Dr. Torgerson’s Toronto Facial Cosmetic Clinic will be injected by Dr. Torgerson only, as he takes special pride and care in the artistic skill necessary to achieve a well sculpted, natural, non-surgical nose job. 

Rhinoplasty is one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries among teenagers. It is important for teenage patients and their surgeons to consider whether or not nose reshaping is an appropriate cosmetic surgery option. Doctors should ensure that the decision to undergo rhinoplasty is the patient's own choice, rather than the result of peer or parental pressure. Regardless of the reason for surgery, doctors recommend that girls wait until age 14 or 15, and that boys wait a few additional years to undergo rhinoplasty. By this time, the nose should have finished growing.
In the initial days after rhinoplasty, it is important that the changes to the nasal tissue be preserved. After closing the incisions made during surgery, a surgeon will place a splint to help retain the new shape of the nose. In some cases, the doctor may also place pieces of gauze, or nasal packing, inside the nostrils. The material will help reduce bleeding and keep the septum in place. The gauze may cause some discomfort. However, it is typically removed within a few days of surgery, and goes a long toward maintaining the results of surgery.

Dr. S. Valentine Fernandes, the Conjoint Senior Clinical Lecturer, at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Newcastle University, conducted a comprehensive study about the risks of rhinoplasty. According to Fernandes, the complication rate of nose surgery falls between 4 and 18.8 percent. While this may seem an alarming number, Fernandes reports that there is a much lower 1.7 to 5 percent risk of life threatening complications. He also notes that the complication rate falls in proportion to the doctor's surgical experience.
Right now, surgeons follow guidelines that set a maximum extraction limit of 5,000 milliliters of fat (11 pounds) for all patients, regardless of variations in weight or body fat status. But the new study suggests surgeons could use a patient's body mass index (BMI) to determine how much fat extraction is safe. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight measurements.
Doctors have recently developed a non-surgical nose job, using dermal fillers to enhance the shape of the nose in one 15-minute treatment. By injecting fillers, such as Radiesse® or Restylane®, the doctor can correct minor asymmetry and make other changes. However, if you are looking for more dramatic results, or if you require reduction rhinoplasty, surgery is the only option. Additionally, a non-surgical nose job cannot treat a deviated septum or other breathing issues. While nasal strips can enhance your breathing, surgery is the only way to permanently treat these conditions.
Tobacco use slows blood flow throughout the body. Because oxygen cannot reach the incision sites very quickly, smokers may face a longer recovery and a higher risk of infection and unfavorable scarring. Although smokers are not automatically disqualified from rhinoplasty, they should quit the habit for at least two weeks before and two weeks after the surgery.

“Patients who undergo open rhinoplasty typically have more edema (swelling) that persists longer compared to patients in whom closed rhinoplasty techniques were used,” says Dr. C. Spencer Cochran, a Dallas, Texas facial plastic surgeon, in a rhinoplasty recovery Q&A. “If the nose was surgically broken by performing osteotomies, then there is usually more swelling and bruising."

Chin augmentation and chin reduction are the two most common treatments to combine with rhinoplasty. To perform chin augmentation, a surgeon places a silicone implant through an incision inside the mouth or just under the chin. In chin reduction, the incisions are placed in the same locations. Then the surgeon reshapes the chin bone, carefully removing millimeters of material to create a more aesthetically pleasing shape.
“I generally recommend that my patients take between three and seven days off after liposuction, depending on how many areas were worked on and your pain tolerance,” Dr. Samuel Sohn, a Henderson, Nevada, plastic surgeon says in a liposuction recovery Q&A. Your doctor will prescribe pain medication, though you may find you only need an over-the-counter pain reliever.
“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”
Rhinoplasty can be performed in one of three places: private surgical suites, ambulatory surgical centers, or hospitals. You should speak with your surgeon and make certain that their chosen venue has been accredited by an organization such as the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgical Facilities (AAAA), the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), or the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO).
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