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Right now, surgeons follow guidelines that set a maximum extraction limit of 5,000 milliliters of fat (11 pounds) for all patients, regardless of variations in weight or body fat status. But the new study suggests surgeons could use a patient's body mass index (BMI) to determine how much fat extraction is safe. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight measurements.
Your nose is one of your most prominent features. If you are dissatisfied with the shape of your nose, and wish to refine it with cosmetic surgery, you should be prepared to define your goals, determine the surest way to achieve those goals, and make no compromises in your pursuit of the results you desire. Meet with several reputable and credentialed surgeons, ask questions, and make your choice based on the surgeon's ability to listen and educate, as well as his or her track record of providing beautiful results.
Karen Hellesvig-Gaskell is a broadcast journalist who began writing professionally in 1980. Her writing focuses on parenting and health, and has appeared in “Spirituality & Health Magazine" and “Essential Wellness.” Hellesvig-Gaskell has worked with autistic children at the Fraser School in Minneapolis and as a child care assistant for toddlers and preschoolers at the International School of Minnesota, Eden Prairie.
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