Recovery from rhinoplasty can take several weeks, and patients should prepare accordingly. In particular, they should take at least two weeks off of work and arrange for a ride home from the hospital or surgical center. If possible, they should find someone who can stay with them for a few days to help with daily tasks. After rhinoplasty, chewing can be uncomfortable, so patients should buy plenty of soft foods to eat during the first several days.
Open rhinoplasty gives the surgeon greater access to the cartilage and bone of the nose but it will leave some scar tissue. By creating an incision across the columella (the area of cartilage between the two nostrils) the doctor can lift the skin off the tip of the nose and shape the cartilage very precisely. When healed, the incision leaves a very small, almost negligible scar on the underside of the nose.
Although these side effects will eventually go away on their own, patients can take precautions to minimize their severity and speed recovery. Pain medication can reduce discomfort, and antibiotics can help control the symptoms of sinusitis. Some surgeons may prescribe drugs immediately after treatment. Patients should take these medications as directed. They should always finish each prescription, unless otherwise instructed by their doctors.
“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”
Rhinoplasty is among the five most popular plastic surgery procedures performed in the United States, with more than 200,000 procedures performed in 2013 alone. [1] During the procedure, a plastic surgeon sculpts the cartilage and bone of the nose to achieve a patient's desired look. For men and women who are unhappy with the size and shape of their nose, rhinoplasty, otherwise known as nose reshaping surgery or a "nose job," offers a safe, effective, and time-tested cosmetic solution. When performed by an experienced, skilled cosmetic surgeon, rhinoplasty can greatly improve the balance of facial features, helping patients discover newfound confidence. Rhinoplasty can also be used to correct structural defects, including those that cause breathing problems.
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."

Rhinoplasty is a highly personal procedure that can affect a person's mental well-being, as well as his or her appearance. Therefore, it is vital that patients choose a surgeon with whom they feel comfortable. They should select a doctor who truly listens to their concerns, answers their questions, and creates a treatment plan that will address their specific goals. Patients should never choose someone who makes unrealistic promises or pressures them to undergo more surgery than they actually want.
Patients who are unhappy with their previous nose job results are candidates for secondary rhinoplasty. Whether the nose is deemed too small, too large, or improperly shaped, a skilled surgeon may be able to correct the problem. Patients who experience breathing difficulties following rhinoplasty may also opt to undergo a second procedure. Factors influencing candidacy for revision rhinoplasty include:

Revision (secondary) rhinoplasty is a cosmetic surgery that is performed when a patient is not satisfied with the outcome of his or her initial procedure. In some cases, patients may be unhappy with the appearance of their noses, while others may experience functional difficulties after surgery. Additionally, a patient may need a secondary procedure if he or she suffers traumatic injury following the first nose reshaping surgery.
During your search for a surgeon, keep in mind that “as with any cosmetic procedure, the price should not be the primary factor in choosing your surgeon,” Orlando, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Armando Soto, says in a RealSelf Q&A. “This is not to say that less expensive surgeons are uniformly going to deliver poor care, just that the costs should be secondary to your overall sense of comfort and confidence in the surgeon you choose.”
Most board certified plastic surgeons will give discounts if more than one area is addressed at the same time. Be careful when comparing pricing between surgeons. Some surgeons will only give you their fee with the surgery center and anesthesiologist billing you separately. Other surgeons will give you a package price which will include their fee, the surgery center and anesthesiologists fee.
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."
A nose job can be done in a private surgical suite, an ambulatory surgical center or a hospital. A hospital is the most expensive setting, while a private surgical suite is the least expensive. Most people can have the work done in a private office or ambulatory setting, which is an outpatient procedure. Should you choose to stay overnight in a hospital and undergo an inpatient treatment, it would significantly increase the overall nose job cost.
Meeting with multiple prospective surgeons is also a great way to make your choice. Make sure you are comfortable speaking to the surgeon, and make sure he or she asks you plenty of questions, and does not rush you through any part of the consultation. After you have fully described your goals, the surgeon should provide you with informative, thoroughly explained options.
“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”
A rhinoplasty reshapes your nose, changes the shape of your nostrils, removes a bump or corrects an injury to the bridge of your nose, or addresses other issues, such as breathing problems. In some cases, people choose to have a nose job in order to correct a defect in the nose that makes it difficult to breathe. In short, a good nose job is one that achieves your personal vision for the surgery and doesn’t require additional procedures.
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."
Rhinoplasty can be performed in one of three places: private surgical suites, ambulatory surgical centers, or hospitals. You should speak with your surgeon and make certain that their chosen venue has been accredited by an organization such as the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgical Facilities (AAAA), the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), or the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO).
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