After the patient is sedated, the surgeon creates tiny incisions inside the nostrils or on the columella. Then he or she carefully lifts the skin to access the underlying bone and cartilage. The surgeon can then remove or graft tissues, as needed. Typically, a doctor uses conservative methods to minimize the impact to the surrounding tissues while still achieving the desired results. When the reshaping process is complete, the doctor lays the skin back down over the new contours of the nose and closes the incisions.
A few weeks before your surgery, you will meet with the surgeon to discuss your personal goals and plan out the procedure. You will also have follow-up appointments post-op to monitor your progress. After surgery, you will need ice packs, gauze and certain pain medication for pain management purposes. All of these pre and post-op appointments and supplies are necessary to take into account when determining what the overall cost of the procedure will be. Be sure to ask your surgeon’s office whether appointments and supplies are included as a package cost and what, if any, additional supplies you may need to buy as you recover from your nose job.
Hospitals are the most expensive choice of facility. In Manhattan, fees can reach $6,000 and beyond for a single procedure. Though it is the most costly option, a hospital is also the best equipped to facilitate surgery involving a patient who is prone to excessive bleeding, or has other conditions that increase the risk of complications. You can expect your doctor to closely examine your medical history to determine if surgery in a hospital is necessary.
In recent years, medical tourism, or going outside the U.S. for a surgery or procedure, has become more popular. Patients go to other countries to have rhinoplasty and other surgery performed at a lower cost. While several other countries, such as South Korea, Columbia, and Italy, may have surgeons willing to perform rhinoplasty at a low cost, the quality and safety standards may not be as closely regulated as they are in the U.S.

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