In recent years, medical tourism, or going outside the U.S. for a surgery or procedure, has become more popular. Patients go to other countries to have rhinoplasty and other surgery performed at a lower cost. While several other countries, such as South Korea, Columbia, and Italy, may have surgeons willing to perform rhinoplasty at a low cost, the quality and safety standards may not be as closely regulated as they are in the U.S.
One of the biggest factors affecting the total cost is if you need to have a second surgery. Because your nose swells during the operation, the surgeon may get a false impression of the final shape of your nose. As the swelling goes down, it may become apparent that a second surgery is necessary to achieve the look you want. Approximately 15 percent of rhinoplasty surgeries require a second surgery.

Right now, surgeons follow guidelines that set a maximum extraction limit of 5,000 milliliters of fat (11 pounds) for all patients, regardless of variations in weight or body fat status. But the new study suggests surgeons could use a patient's body mass index (BMI) to determine how much fat extraction is safe. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight measurements.
You can also ask to see before and after photos and testimonials from past patients. In addition to making sure your surgeon is highly experienced, you should feel comfortable talking to him or her. Do you feel the surgeon is hearing you and understanding your goals for the procedure? Establishing a rapport with the surgeon is extremely important to ensure that you get the results you want.
Rhinoplasty is a highly personal procedure that can affect a person's mental well-being, as well as his or her appearance. Therefore, it is vital that patients choose a surgeon with whom they feel comfortable. They should select a doctor who truly listens to their concerns, answers their questions, and creates a treatment plan that will address their specific goals. Patients should never choose someone who makes unrealistic promises or pressures them to undergo more surgery than they actually want.
“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”
Private surgical suites, usually located in the surgeon's office, carry the least expensive facility fees. Usually ranging in cost from $1,000 to $3,000 per procedure, a private surgical facility can offer many advantages. The doctor is very familiar with the facility, and is likely working with the same staff members who have assisted in many previous surgeries. I operate in a certified private surgical facility where my patients enjoy the ultimate privacy and personalized care. In this setting, I am able to hand-pick each of my staff members personally, from nurses to anesthesiologists.

One of the main things to keep in mind regarding medical tourism is how difficult it may be to see or even contact your doctor after surgery. Follow-up appointments are extremely important. When surgery is performed internationally, patients either miss post-operative appointments or have to stay in the area for an extended period of time. When you have surgery closer to home, you can more easily attend these appointments and visit your surgeon if any other problems or concerns arise. Many surgeons like myself will revise their own work at no additional charge except for anesthesia fees or surgical venue fees.

Right now, surgeons follow guidelines that set a maximum extraction limit of 5,000 milliliters of fat (11 pounds) for all patients, regardless of variations in weight or body fat status. But the new study suggests surgeons could use a patient's body mass index (BMI) to determine how much fat extraction is safe. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight measurements.
If you’re unhappy about fat deposits around your stomach that won’t surrender to diet or exercise, you have plenty of company. Liposuction is now the most popular form of cosmetic surgery in the United States, with 396,048 procedures performed in 2015, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. While there’s no magic wand to make jiggly belly fat go away, liposuction may offer a solution for love handles and other unwanted forms of flab. If you’re considering liposuction for your stomach, here are five things you need to know to make an informed decision.

At the same time, patients will also need to avoid certain foods and supplements, which could slow healing and cause surgical complications. In particular, patients should steer clear of vitamin E supplements, ginger, gingko, and ginseng. Some homeopathic and herbal supplements can cause complications with anesthesia, so patients should check with their doctors before taking additional nutrition.
Like facelift surgery, brow lift surgery eliminates sagging skin and reduces deep creases. However, brow lifts specifically target the forehead and the area between the eyebrows. The doctor creates an incision along the hairline or the crown of the head. Then he or she lifts the underlying muscles to reduce frown lines, vertical creases, sagging eyebrows, and hooded brows.
It’s important to understand exactly what your doctor’s quote includes. Does the number only include your surgeon’s fee? Or will it cover anesthesia, hospital fees, pre- or post-op appointments, and medications you’ll need throughout your recovery? If your doctor’s estimate doesn’t consider all those costs, be sure to factor them into your budget. Also be sure to ask how your surgeon handles revisions, in case you aren’t happy with your initial results.
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