If a patient has suffered an injury to the nose, he or she may benefit from post-traumatic rhinoplasty. This procedure can address both appearance and functionality. Doctors may use this procedure to straighten the nose and correct the nasal septum. Often, post-traumatic patients have suffered a broken nose. In these cases, a doctor may have to re-fracture the nose and re-set it to achieve the desired results. A doctor can usually set a simple broken nose within 10 days of the fracture. However, if a patient has suffered a serious nose injury, he or she may have to wait several months before undergoing extensive surgery.
In recent years, medical tourism, or going outside the U.S. for a surgery or procedure, has become more popular. Patients go to other countries to have rhinoplasty and other surgery performed at a lower cost. While several other countries, such as South Korea, Columbia, and Italy, may have surgeons willing to perform rhinoplasty at a low cost, the quality and safety standards may not be as closely regulated as they are in the U.S.
Doctors have recently developed a non-surgical nose job, using dermal fillers to enhance the shape of the nose in one 15-minute treatment. By injecting fillers, such as Radiesse® or Restylane®, the doctor can correct minor asymmetry and make other changes. However, if you are looking for more dramatic results, or if you require reduction rhinoplasty, surgery is the only option. Additionally, a non-surgical nose job cannot treat a deviated septum or other breathing issues. While nasal strips can enhance your breathing, surgery is the only way to permanently treat these conditions.

Surgical facilities: If a doctor does not have his or her own operating facilities, the procedure will take place at a hospital or ambulatory surgical center. These locations charge separate fees, which will vary depending on location, reputation, and equipment. Again, many patients are willing to pay slightly higher costs to enjoy greater safety and comfort.

Karen Hellesvig-Gaskell is a broadcast journalist who began writing professionally in 1980. Her writing focuses on parenting and health, and has appeared in “Spirituality & Health Magazine" and “Essential Wellness.” Hellesvig-Gaskell has worked with autistic children at the Fraser School in Minneapolis and as a child care assistant for toddlers and preschoolers at the International School of Minnesota, Eden Prairie.
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