“Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function (i.e. septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction),” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The extent of coverage varies based on the details of the insurance plan. Insurance will not cover procedures that improve the appearance of the nose but are not necessary to improve nasal function.”
Recovery from rhinoplasty can take several weeks, and patients should prepare accordingly. In particular, they should take at least two weeks off of work and arrange for a ride home from the hospital or surgical center. If possible, they should find someone who can stay with them for a few days to help with daily tasks. After rhinoplasty, chewing can be uncomfortable, so patients should buy plenty of soft foods to eat during the first several days.
Right now, surgeons follow guidelines that set a maximum extraction limit of 5,000 milliliters of fat (11 pounds) for all patients, regardless of variations in weight or body fat status. But the new study suggests surgeons could use a patient's body mass index (BMI) to determine how much fat extraction is safe. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight measurements.
Tobacco use slows blood flow throughout the body. Because oxygen cannot reach the incision sites very quickly, smokers may face a longer recovery and a higher risk of infection and unfavorable scarring. Although smokers are not automatically disqualified from rhinoplasty, they should quit the habit for at least two weeks before and two weeks after the surgery.
Once you decide to have liposuction, you want to find a surgeon you can trust to perform it. When looking for a plastic surgeon, find someone who has the proper skill and expertise, knows which procedure will be most effective, makes you feel comfortable, and respects your decisions. At the Royal Centre of Plastic Surgery, we pride ourselves on exceptional patient care.
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