The patient's medical history and overall health can elevate the level of difficulty of the surgery. For example, if you are suffering from an immune deficiency or a chronic condition, such as uncontrolled diabetes, you instantly increase the complexity of the surgery. This also affects your recovery. You may need more time to relapse and get back to your everyday routine, which might mean you will need to take more medications after the surgery (for a longer time than usual), and potentially more time off work. All that equals more money spent on your behalf.
“I generally recommend that my patients take between three and seven days off after liposuction, depending on how many areas were worked on and your pain tolerance,” Dr. Samuel Sohn, a Henderson, Nevada, plastic surgeon says in a liposuction recovery Q&A. Your doctor will prescribe pain medication, though you may find you only need an over-the-counter pain reliever.
During your search for a surgeon, keep in mind that “as with any cosmetic procedure, the price should not be the primary factor in choosing your surgeon,” Orlando, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Armando Soto, says in a RealSelf Q&A. “This is not to say that less expensive surgeons are uniformly going to deliver poor care, just that the costs should be secondary to your overall sense of comfort and confidence in the surgeon you choose.” 

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