Dr. Weinberg does not endorse or lend his name to any specific product, medication, or device. The information on this page is meant to familiarize prospective patients with some of the commonly available treatments/products and devices in use for specific issues and is intended for general educational purposes only. Decisions regarding treatments in a specific patient must be made in the context of a medical consultation.
Dr. S. Valentine Fernandes, the Conjoint Senior Clinical Lecturer, at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Newcastle University, conducted a comprehensive study about the risks of rhinoplasty. According to Fernandes, the complication rate of nose surgery falls between 4 and 18.8 percent. While this may seem an alarming number, Fernandes reports that there is a much lower 1.7 to 5 percent risk of life threatening complications. He also notes that the complication rate falls in proportion to the doctor's surgical experience.
Any licensed physician can perform liposuction, but it’s usually performed by plastic surgeons and dermatologists in their offices with local anesthesia, though it may be performed in a hospital under general anesthesia. No special training is required, though some doctors’ professional associations recommend it. When choosing a doctor, you may want to consider whether they have had specific training for liposuction and how many they have performed.
If you’re unhappy about fat deposits around your stomach that won’t surrender to diet or exercise, you have plenty of company. Liposuction is now the most popular form of cosmetic surgery in the United States, with 396,048 procedures performed in 2015, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. While there’s no magic wand to make jiggly belly fat go away, liposuction may offer a solution for love handles and other unwanted forms of flab. If you’re considering liposuction for your stomach, here are five things you need to know to make an informed decision.
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